“Whether your pool is due for new plaster and tile, the liner needs to be replaced, or the coping and patio is being revamped, you don’t want to rush any investment into your family’s enjoyment of your pool and outdoor living space.”
-Donovan Marhold, Project Manager

A pool renovation, whether structurally necessary or simply an aesthetic makeover, can add new levels of enjoyment to an existing and perhaps outdated swimming pool.

The photograph below illustrates the concept of subtle boulder placement and minimalistic patio along with a fun natural stone water feature! By only installing patio on one side of the pool, the money saved can be invested into adding unique features such as the waterfall shown in the photo. This allows you to make the pool your own special escape from the boring “cookie cutter” pools that are so commonly seen in backyards across the country.

Some things to consider when planning your inground swimming pool renovation:

  1. Sit down with your family and discuss what features or functions of your pool each person likes (or dislikes) in its current design. As children grow, their interests and enjoyment of the pool can change dramatically. For example, when they are younger they may enjoy playing games in the shallow end of the pool, but as the get older they develop a new passion for fitness and swimming laps.
  2. Next it’s time to brainstorm on the possible aesthetic improvements such as adding sitting walls around the pool, fire features, pergolas, fountains, outdoor kitchens, etc.
  3. Calculate a budget for your project, whether its broken down into several improvements over a few seasons or one big project.
  4. Consult the design specialists at Rin Robyn Pools to help achieve a layout and estimate for your project ideas. Some renovations could cause unnecessary damage to the landscape or compromise the structural integrity of your swimming vessel, so consulting a professional even at the early stages is important. There may also be options available you have never seen or heard about! For example, if your pool needs a new interior finish you could renovate it with PoolHide®, a 60 mil heat welded PVC membrane which improves the look, feel and durability of your pool. Even concrete pools can be lined with PoolHide®. Or you could convert your sterile chemical pool to a completely chemical-free Natural Swimming Pool!
  5. Consult with a Rin Robyn Pools Project Manager to determine whether or not any permits will be required for the project.

Pictured below is an example of a pool lined with PoolHide® Stoneflex Grey 60 mil PVC waterproofing membrane. This durable material will outlast vinyl liners and is also puncture and scratch-resistant which is a great feature when underwater benches and tanning ledges are incorporated into the pool design. PoolHide® also makes the pool pet friendly, protecting the pool against damage from your pet’s claws, and protecting your pets from injury due to the rough plaster surface of a concrete pool.

Here you see a chemical-free Natural Swimming Pool which is also lined with PoolHide®, in this case it’s our special Eco-Green color which is both natural looking and eco-friendly.

Just like when planning a new pool construction, the best time to begin discussing your renovation is during the off-season. Whether your pool is due for new plaster and tile, the liner needs to be replaced, or the coping and patio is being revamped, you don’t want to rush any investment into your family’s enjoyment of your pool and outdoor living space.

Our harsh winters can cause many issues for your swimming pool and patio, including tile damage, roughening of the surface, settling and shifting of patio stones, and water chemistry problems which may affect your ability to keep your pool clean and clear. Our recommendation is to have an experienced swimming pool professional inspect your coping, patio and liner/plaster condition every 2-3 seasons in order to advise you of any maintenance required or to identify minor issues early, preventing them from snowballing into more costly expenses down the line. It could mean the difference between a small repair and a major renovation!